Mommy Burnout: Tips To Overcome ASD Parenting Exhaustion

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It is that time of the year. Everybody is getting ready for the holiday celebrations, decorating their houses, and buying presents for their children. Everybody seems excited, full of joy, and energized. Everybody but you.

Its not the fact that you are ungrateful, or unhappy, its just simply the fact that you feel exhausted. Sounds familiar? 

You are not alone. According to recent studies, up to 30% of neurotypical parents present some level of parenting burnout. Now imagine the numbers for parents with children on the spectrum.

Today, we will analyze the symptoms of mommy burnout, as well as tips and recommendations to ease it and make you feel at your best again.

Mommy Burnout

Mommy burnout is a condition that can lead mothers to extreme exhaustion, emotional draining, and in extreme cases mental breakdowns. Some of the symptoms include:

  1. Overwhelming exhaustion.
  2. Emotional detachment from one’s children.
  3. Loss of effectiveness and pleasure in the parental role.
  4. Marked change in behavior towards one’s children.

What Causes Mommy Burnout?

Just like in work burnouts, parenting/mommy burnout comes to play when the parent neglects his/her own needs and personal time to ensure their childs wellbeing.

For mommies on the spectrum, the challenge goes to a whole new level due to the nature of the challenges of autistic children.

Dealing with Mommy Burnout

Since the root issue of mommy burnout is traced back to selfdenial, providing time for yourself and your personal needs is urgent, to ease the symptoms.

Give Yourself Time Out

Just like in work, you need a time out to reconnect and function better. Motherhood is a 24/7 full-time job, and although your child is your most precious asset, you need time for you! Stop neglecting yourself and take that needed break. Dont feel guilty for asking your partner/family/friend to watch for your child for a couple of hours. We guarantee you that your son/daughter will be fine and you will feel renewed.

Talk to Someone

When it comes to parenting on the spectrum, you need to remember that you are not alone. Joining support groups, or just hanging out with mommies in the same situation will help you feel understood and part of a community

Let Go of Perfection and Guilt

Perfect parents and unicorns have one thing in common, they don´t exist. You are a mother who is managing a lot of stuff that most neurotypical moms would never imagine. Let go of the lie of not being enough, not doing enough, not learning enough, not being fun enough. Dear mommy, you are not just enough, you are too much! You are doing more than your best and you DESERVE a little me time.

Have Grace for You

Recently, I spoke with a dear friend of mine who is a new mom. She was in pain due to an unattended root canal that she had since her daughter was born. The baby is almost a year now and she wasnt going to the dentist due to the guilt of letting her with a nanny or asking her husband to take a day off from work.

This might seem like an extreme case for many, but this is the sad reality for most mommies on the spectrum. I can guarantee that you wouldnt let your son/daughter go through the same pain you do for an hour… then why do you allow it for yourself?

Taking care of yourself is not selfish, it is NECESSARY!  Let go of the guilt of attending to yourself and your needs and please allow yourself to receive a small fraction of all the love that you selflessly give away daily. You deserve all the love in the world, thank you for being so strong and courageous.  You are a true champion!

At WSCC, we offer support for autistic families and their children with Stem Cell Therapy treatments that can transform autistic conditions by healing the gut, decreasing inflammation and improving brain function. We also created an autistic community on Facebook that is destined to offer support and companionship for ASD parents and their families on their journey.

 Remember, you are not alone!

 

https://worldstemcellsclinic.com/

 

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